Chinkapin Oak

97-07   Chinkapin oak (Quercus muehlenbergii) is the most lime-tolerant oak species in our area. This tree can be found on prairie and limestone-based soils in the Springfield area and is scattered over a broader natural range in the US, Canada, and Mexico than any other oak in North America. Also known as yellow chestnut oak, its linear, toothed leaves resemble those of chestnut trees. It was grown from an acorn of the majestic old tree in West Cotton Hill Park on Lake Springfield that probably is as old as the city itself.

96-15      The western form of chinkapin oak, (Quercus muhlenbergii var, brayii) is very similar to those found in our general area but often develops more shaggy bark and forms much larger acorns. Our trees were grown from seed collected near Roswell, New Mexico. Chinkapin oak has the largest and most diverse natural range of any North American oak.

99-13      Chinkapin oak (Quercus muehlenbergii) is the most lime-tolerant oak species native to our local area. This tree can be found on prairie and limestone-based soils in the Springfield vicinity and is scattered over a broader natural range in the US, Canada, and northen Mexico than any other oak in North America. Also known as yellow chestnut oak, its linear, toothed leaves resemble those of chestnut trees. It was grown from an acorn of the majestic old tree in West Cotton Hill Park on Lake Springfield that probably is as old as the city itself.

 

Location:

97-07  39.8204995 N, 89.6536983 W     Get walking directions here.

96-15   39.818094 N, 89.662786 W        Get walking directions here.

99-13   39.818109 N,  89.661569 W       Get walking directions here.

 

 

 

 

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