Tree Database

Historic Trees in Oak Ridge

 

Number ID CODE Tree Name Scientific Name DESCRIPTION LOCATION QR CODE Tour Year
1 0-001 Cottonwood Populus deltoides A giant native cottonwood (Populus deltoides) nearly 100′ tall and more than 23′ in circumference can be seen here, with interesting burl formations – it is thought to be the largest tree in Springfield and is being protected with structural cabling to help it withstand unusually severe storms. 39.824683 N, 89.659263 W  1 Cottonwood 2014
2 0-002 Silver Maple Acer saccharinum f. Laciniatum This cut-leaf cultivar of our native silver maple (Acer saccharinum f. Laciniatum) probably was planted during the early 1900s when the central valley of Oak Ridge featured the lagoons – it was a popular ornamental shade tree in the late 1800s and develops a fine texture and slightly pendulous habit. 39.82406 N, 89.658083 W  2 Silver Maple 2014
3 0-003 Cucumber Magnolia Magnolia acuminata The Cucumber magnolia (Magnolia acuminata) at the Bell Tower is one of the largest specimens in Springfield and is the only native Illinois magnolia species, found growing wild in Union and Alexander Counties. Its flowers are pale yellow and it bears small, cucumber-like fruit follicles. It probably was one of the earliest flowering trees planted at Oak Ridge, perhaps when the bell tower was built. 39.824218 N, 89.655532 W  3 Cucumber Magnolia 2014 / 2015
4 0-004 Bur Oak Quercus macrocarpa This is the stump of the bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) Witness Tree – this tree was determined by ring count to have been a small sapling that witnessed Lincoln’s funeral. Unfortunately, the tree was not visible in photographs of Lincoln’s funeral and could be dated only by counting tree rings after it died from a lightning strike and was removed. Two replacement bur oak saplings can be seen nearby. 39.824355 N, 89.654577 W  4 Bur Oak 2014
5 0-005 White Pine Pinus strobus The white pine (Pinus strobus) you see on this hillside was one of several purchased from Phoenix Nursery in Bloomington and planted in 1862 according to the minutes of the Oak Ridge Board of managers. The tree developed a broom mutation at its top from a lightning strike. The broom, since lost to a tornado, was propagated and gave us the dwarf cultivar Pinus strobus ‘Phoenix’. 39.824492 N, 89.654315 W  5 White Pine 2014
6 0-006 Osage-orange Maclura pomifera Several Osage-orange (Maclura pomifera) trees plus a few stumps remain from a boundary hedge row planted in 1865 according to the minutes of the Oak Ridge Board of managers. At least one of these trees is fully thornless and is being propagated as a cultivar. We are watching to see which of the trees are males and which are females because the males are fruitless. 39.825358 N, 89.654208 W  6 Osage Orange 2014 / 2015
7 0-007 White Oak Quercus alba One of the original white oaks (Quercus alba) present during Lincoln’s funeral, this 15’ circumference specimen develops deeply incised leaves and has been propagated by the famous Arboretum Trompenburg in Rotterdam (Netherlands) and named as the cultivar ‘Lincoln’. It has been grafted in Belgium and is sold by specialty nurseries throughout Europe. 39.82359 N, 89.65591 W  9 White Oak 2014
8 0-008 Mockernut Hickory Carya tomentosa Standing in the yard of the original residence of the manager of Lincoln’s Tomb, this mockernut hickory (Carya tomentosa) is one of the original trees of Oak Ridge and has been here since before the cemetery was founded. It colors brilliantly in early autumn and bears edible nuts prized by squirrels. 39.823107 N, 89.656043 W  8 Mockernut Hickory 2014
9 0-009 Framing Oak Quercus alba Called the Framing Oak, this white oak (Quercus alba) is used by photographers to frame the view of Lincoln’s Tomb and may be seen in many photographs, including some of those on the web site of the Oak Ridge Cemetery Foundation. This tree probably was a sapling during the time of Lincoln’s funeral in 1865, and saw the subsequent construction of his Tomb. 39.82276 N, 89.656788 W  9 White Oak 2014
10 0-010 Overcup Oak Quercus lyrata Two overcup oaks (Quercus lyrata), including this one, may be seen at Lincoln’s Tomb (the other is west of the parking lot below the wall) as well as two more at Lincoln’s New Salem. These trees are not native here and might have been brought nearly a century ago from Lincoln’s birthplace, where they can be found in lowland areas of the native forest. They have beautiful spring and fall color and are very resistant to damage from flooding. 39.822538 N, 89.656477 W  10 Overcup Oak 2014
11 0-011 Hybrid Oak Quercus humidicola This hybrid oak (Quercus humidicola) probably was planted at the same time and from the same source as the overcup oak next to it, but it was grown from an acorn pollinated by swamp white oak, another lowland forest tree. Oaks are notorious for their tendencies to hybridize. We may only speculate about the Lincoln-associated origin of these trees, but they have strong circumstantial evidence supporting their claim. 39.822538 N, 89.656477 W  11 Hybrid Oak 2014
12 0-012 American Smoke Cotinus obovatus American smoke trees (Cotinus obovatus) are some of the most colorful and drought-hardy small native trees in North America. These twin specimens have been here for decades and probably are the largest ones in Springfield. They offer their smoke-like flower clusters as well as brilliant fall color, and become larger than their more commonly planted Eurasian relative, purple smoke bush. They are found naturally on limestone hills in the southern United States but are fully hardy throughout Illinois. 39.82257 N, 89.657503 W  12 American Smoke 2014
13 0-013 Canadian Hemlock Tsuga canadensis This old Canadian hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) probably was planted in 1862 as part of a project to bring evergreen trees from Bloomington Nursery to Oak Ridge for their winter beauty and their traditional symbolism representing everlasting life. Look for other old hemlocks in the north part of Oak Ridge. 39.825739 N, 89.654497 W  Hemlock 2015
14 0-014 Ohio Buckeye Aesculus glabra An Ohio buckeye (Aesculus glabra) that might be a spontaneous tree original to the cemetery. Our native buckeye trees can live for centuries but grow slowly to only a moderate size. Their leaves are among the first to emerge in Illinois, followed by their yellow flowers in mid-spring and poisonous “lucky buckeye” nuts in early autumn. We have grown several seedlings from this old tree which you can see planted elsewhere in Oak Ridge. 39.825633 N, 89.654725 W  Buckeye 2015
15 0-015 Wild Black Cherry Prunus serotina This wild black cherry (Prunus serotina) probably was seeded here by birds during the past Century. Black cherry yields the most valuable furniture wood in North America after black walnut, and is also useful for the fruits which are sought by birds. Each fruit cluster has cherries of varying ripeness, with only the darkest ones being palatable to humans. 39.825492 N, 89.654675 W  Wild Black Cherry 2015
16 0-016 Ginkgo Ginkgo biloba Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) is a dioecious tree (separate males and females) with fruit production limited to female trees like this one. Normally the fruits emit a very offensive odor, but examination of this specimen showed that its fruits are much less (but still!) odiferous. Ginkgoes are actually conifers with broad leaves, and they can live for more than 1000 years. 39.825381 N, 89.654436 W  Gingko 2015
17 0-017 Post Oak Quercus stellata There are several old-growth post oak trees (Quercus stellata) at Oak Ridge, and all of them predate the Civil War and the founding of the cemetery. The tree has rock-hard wood, grows very slowly, is found here on dry slopes, and can live for many centuries. Springfield is very near the northern edge of the natural range of this species. 39.824956 N, 89.654922 W  Post Oak 2015
18 0-018 Eastern RedCedar Juniperus virginiana A few old eastern redcedar trees (Juniperus virginiana) such as this twin specimen can be found at Oak Ridge. The species is native in this area but probably was planted here in the early days of the cemetery for its evergreen foliage. Redcedar is not truly a cedar but rather a juniper. It’s very valuable for wildlife and its wood, and can live for many centuries. These two are female trees and bear the blue fruits used by birds and gin-makers. 39.825361 N, 89.655294 W  Red Cedar 2015
19 0-019 Sassafras Sassafras albidum The sassafras tree (Sassafras albidum) is an aromatic native species known for its fall color, spring flowers, red fruits (on female trees only), and the root beer flavored “tea” or tonic made from its roots by pioneers. There are several groups of sassafras in Oak Ridge, and each group probably originated as root sprouts from spontaneous seedling trees – note another sassafras tree nearby. Some of the groups are female while others are male. 39.825528 N, 89.655519 W  12 Sassafras 2015
20 0-020 American Arborvitae Thuja occidentalis American arborvitae (Thuja occidentalis), or tree of life, is a long-lived conifer that was often planted in 19th Century cemeteries for its pleasant aroma and evergreen foliage. It is native in a few places in northern Illinois and is more common farther north. The foliage, unlike that of junipers, spruces, and some pines, is soft and touch-friendly. 39.826089 N, 89.654747 W  American Arborvitae 2015
21 94-02 Overcup Oak Quercus lyrata This overcup oak (Quercus lyrata ) was grown from seed collected in Macoupin County, from a hardy tree growing far north of the natural range of the species. It has lustrous foliage that appears evergreen but is not. We chose this beautiful specimen to plant at the Funeral Vault. 39.824042 N, 89.656072 W  Overcup Oak 2015
22 94-03f Cory Hybrid Oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) ( = Quercus ×coryana) A Cory hybrid oak derived from swamp white oak and chinkapin oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) ( = Quercus ×coryana) grown from seed collected here in Oak Ridge that has reverted substantially to its Quercus bicolor grandparent (this phenomenon is called “affinity Q. bicolor”). It displays hybrid vigor and is becoming an outstanding shade tree. 39.826161 N, 89.655172 W  94-03 f Cory Hybrid Oak 2015
23 94-04 Cory Hybrid Oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) ( = Quercus ×coryana) This cory hybrid oak has the same parent species as 94-03. This one, however, was propagated from a broadly spreading parent in the Oak Ridge Garden of the Good Shepherd while 94-03 was grown from a tall, pyramidal tree no longer standing. We plan to watch these trees as they mature to see if the growth habits of the parents were inherited by this generation. 39.820989 N, 89.653619 W  Cory Hybrid 94-04 2015
24 95-12 Butternut Juglans cinerea Butternut (Juglans cinerea) is a rare species because a fungus blight has killed most of them in their native forests. This specimen was grown from a large cultivated tree in Springfield. The nuts are edible and the husks were used in pioneer times to make a dye – it was used for Confederate uniforms during the Civil War. 39.825803 N, 89.655331 W  Butternut 2015
25 96-03 European Pedunculate Oak Quercus robur European pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) is a variable tree with an enormous natural range in Europe. This one was grown from seed obtained via the Morton Arboretum, accession number 563-32. It can become a giant tree that can live for 1000 years 39.825156 N, 89.654953 W  Pendunculate Oak 2015
26 96-14 Bebb Hybrid Oak bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) with white oak (Q. alba) (= Quercus ×bebbiana) Bebb hybrid oak, a vigorous F2 cross of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) with white oak (Q. alba) (= Quercus ×bebbiana), this specimen shows affinity toward the bur oak grandparent but retains the deeply dissected leaves of the parent, which was found in Washington Park in Springfield and has since been removed. 39.825550 N, 89.654300 W 2015
27 00-01 Sessile Oak Quercus petraea The sessile oak (Quercus petraea) is one of the two common oaks of northern and western Europe. This one was grown from seed collected from the Tausendjahrige Eiche (Thousand-Year-Old Oak) protected under law as a National Natural Landmark in Oberhausen, Germany. This is the species used for wine barrels, heavy timbers and, formerly, ship masts. 39.820725 N, 89.654864 W  Sessile Oak Entrance
28 0-021 American Holly Ilex opaca An American holly (Ilex opaca) has stood as a sentinel at the Monument Avenue entrance for many decades. Being dioecious, these trees are either male or female and only the females (if pollinated by a male) produce the famous red berries. It is one of the few broadleaf evergreen trees that are fully hardy in the Springfield area. 39.820147 N, 89.654028 W  American Holly Entrance
29 0-022 Pin Oak Quercus palustris One of several pin oak trees (Quercus palustris) at Oak Ridge, this is the first large tree you will encounter on your right upon entering the gate. Pin oaks are tolerant of transplanting and are frequently seen in residential areas, but they need acidic, moist soil to thrive. There are several of these trees in the cemetery, including one just up the road to your right. They were not native in Oak Ridge and were planted sometime during the 20th century. 39.820472 N, 89.654281 W  Pin Oak Entrance
30 0-023b Catalpa Catalpa speciosa Two large catalpa trees (Catalpa speciosa, b and c) can be seen west of the east road on your way to the maintenance headquarters. They are very old and may have been planted about the time the Monument Avenue entrance was opened. This beautifully flowering tree is the native catalpa species of Illinois, and although its historic range was limited to southern Illinois it can be seen statewide now due to many plantings by pioneer families. 39.821367 N, 89.653700 W  Catalpa Entrance
31 0-023c Catalpa Catalpa speciosa Two large catalpa trees (Catalpa speciosa, b and c) can be seen west of the east road on your way to the maintenance headquarters. They are very old and may have been planted about the time the Monument Avenue entrance was opened. This beautifully flowering tree is the native catalpa species of Illinois, and although its historic range was limited to southern Illinois it can be seen statewide now due to many plantings by pioneer families. 39.820881 N, 89.653861 W  Catalpa Entrance
32 0-024 Colorado Spruce Picea pungens Many Colorado spruce trees (Picea pungens) can be seen throughout the Midwest, brought here from their native range in the Rocky Mountains. Some specimens were selected for their blue-tinted glaucous needles, giving them the common name blue spruce. They can thrive in our climate while young, but mature specimens may suffer from fungus diseases in the heat and humidity of central Illinois. 39.820519 N, 89.654708 W  Colorado Spruce Entrance
33 0-025 Norway Spuce Picea abies European Norway spruce (Picea abies) was widely planted by early settlers from the Old World, where it is the traditional Christmas tree. It is also a traditional cemetery tree, and many more can be found in the older part of Oak Ridge. It is one of the largest spruce species, and can attain great size and age on favorable sites. There is another a few steps to the northwest, and some of those in the northeastern part of Oak Ridge date back to the original planting in 1862. 39.820706 N, 89.655031 W  Norway Spruce Entrance
34 0-026b American Basswood Tilia americana Two American basswood trees (Tilia americana, b and c) Grow north of the Abbey. It is possible that these two old trees were growing here prior to the founding of Oak Ridge. Bee keepers prize this locally native species for its flower nectar. Several were planted in the 1840s near Lincoln’s home during the time he lived there. They are closely related to the European linden species, but are not as susceptible to Japanese beetle damage. 39.820642 N, 89.655119 W  American Basswood Entrance
35 0-026c American Basswood Tilia americana Two American basswood trees (Tilia americana, b and c) Grow north of the Abbey. It is possible that these two old trees were growing here prior to the founding of Oak Ridge. Bee keepers prize this locally native species for its flower nectar. Several were planted in the 1840s near Lincoln’s home during the time he lived there. They are closely related to the European linden species, but are not as susceptible to Japanese beetle damage. 39.820661 N, 89.655244 W  American Basswood Entrance
36 0-027 Black Oak Quercus velutina Black oak (Quercus velutina) was one of the most common original trees in Oak Ridge. Many giant old specimens can be found here, but none are larger than this one. Black oak is one of our most adaptable native oaks and thrives in a broad range of soil types, from very dry to average in moisture. It would have been one of the primary trees split for fence rails at New Salem by young Abraham Lincoln in the 1830s. 39.820831 N, 89.655092 W  Black Oak Entrance
37 0-028 Green Ash Fraxinus pennsylvanica Green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) the only ash tree in Oak Ridge likely to survive the invasive emerald ash borer because it is being treated by a volunteer arborist from Clanton Tree Company. This young specimen shades the cemetery office and provides stunning fall color to welcome visitors. Prior to 2015, there were many healthy and beautiful ash trees (white and green) in Oak Ridge and the surrounding community. 39.819937 N, 89.654426 W  Green Ash Entrance
38 94-03b Cory Hybrid Oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) (= Quercus ×coryana) These four cory hybrid oak trees (b, c, d, and e) derived from swamp white oak and chinkapin oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) (= Quercus ×coryana) and were grown from seed collected here in Oak Ridge. They have reverted substantially to their Quercus bicolor grandparent (this phenomenon is called “affinity Q. bicolor”). They display hybrid vigor and are becoming outstanding shade trees. Compare the four trees with one another and with tree # 94-04, and see if you can spot the minor differences that such hybrid trees sometimes exhibit. 39.820089 N, 89.654997 W  94-03 f Cory Hybrid Oak Entrance
39 94-03c Cory Hybrid Oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) (= Quercus ×coryana) These four cory hybrid oak trees (b, c, d, and e) derived from swamp white oak and chinkapin oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) (= Quercus ×coryana) and were grown from seed collected here in Oak Ridge. They have reverted substantially to their Quercus bicolor grandparent (this phenomenon is called “affinity Q. bicolor”). They display hybrid vigor and are becoming outstanding shade trees. Compare the four trees with one another and with tree # 94-04, and see if you can spot the minor differences that such hybrid trees sometimes exhibit. 39.820122 N, 89.654819 W  94-03 f Cory Hybrid Oak Entrance
40 94-03d Cory Hybrid Oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) (= Quercus ×coryana) These four cory hybrid oak trees (b, c, d, and e) derived from swamp white oak and chinkapin oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) (= Quercus ×coryana) and were grown from seed collected here in Oak Ridge. They have reverted substantially to their Quercus bicolor grandparent (this phenomenon is called “affinity Q. bicolor”). They display hybrid vigor and are becoming outstanding shade trees. Compare the four trees with one another and with tree # 94-04, and see if you can spot the minor differences that such hybrid trees sometimes exhibit. 39.820811 N, 89.655425 W  94-03 f Cory Hybrid Oak Entrance
41 94-03e Cory Hybrid Oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) (= Quercus ×coryana) These four cory hybrid oak trees (b, c, d, and e) derived from swamp white oak and chinkapin oak (Quercus bicolor × Q. muehlenbergii F2) (= Quercus ×coryana) and were grown from seed collected here in Oak Ridge. They have reverted substantially to their Quercus bicolor grandparent (this phenomenon is called “affinity Q. bicolor”). They display hybrid vigor and are becoming outstanding shade trees. Compare the four trees with one another and with tree # 94-04, and see if you can spot the minor differences that such hybrid trees sometimes exhibit. 39.821172 N, 89.653583 W  94-03 f Cory Hybrid Oak Entrance
42 94-07 Ware’s Oak Quercus ×warei There are several Ware’s oak trees (Quercus ×warei) here at Oak Ridge, planted as an experiment to evaluate the variability and adaptability of this hybrid. Look for other conspicuously narrow oaks especially in the western half of Oak Ridge. They resulted from crossing the upright English oak (Quercus robur ‘Fastigiata’) with swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor). 39.820731 N, 89.654494 W  Ware's Oak Entrance
43 94-09 Deam Oak Quercus xdeamii The Deam oak (Quercus xdeamii) is a native hybrid of bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) and chinkapin oak (Quercus muehlenbergii). Second generation (F2) trees often revert to look mostly like one of the parents. In this case, our tree most closely resembles the bur oak parent, and can be described as F2 Deam oak, affinity bur oak. There are others of this accession at Oak Ridge, and they all have the extremely corky bur oak bark uncharacteristic of the original tree. 39.820861 N, 89.655669 W  Deam Oak Entrance
44 94-15 Emperor Oak Quercus dentata The Emperor oak (Quercus dentata) is an ornamental species from eastern Asia. We have several of these unusual trees scattered around the grounds. This one has been grown at Starhill Forest Arboretum from the beautiful acorns of some of the oldest specimens in Illinois, collected in China by the Morton Arboretum. It will breed true because it is not closely related enough to any American oaks to hybridize. 39.820617 N, 89.654014 W  Emperor Oak Entrance
45 95-10 Sawtooth Oak Quercus acutissima Sawtooth oak (Quercus acutissima) is a common Asian species related to the emperor oak. It is planted for its acorn production in some southern US wildlife management areas, and elsewhere as an ornamental shade tree. This specimen came from seed of a hardy northern source being grown at the Morton Arboretum (#463-55). Sawtooth oak will not cross with North American oaks, so any volunteer seedlings found here will not be hybrids. 39.820950 N, 89.654931 W  Sawtooth Oak Entrance
46 97-15 Northern Red Oak Quercus rubra The northern red oak (Quercus rubra) is common in our general area but, preferring slightly different soil, is not often seen as a remnant of the original forest of Oak Ridge. We have found only one very old red oak here, growing on a shaded north-facing slope. Our young tree was grown from seed of the specimen next to the statue of Governor Yates on the State Capitol grounds. In time red oak can become one of the largest of all oaks in Illinois. 39.820708 N, 89.655519 W  Northern Red Oak Entrance
47 0-029 Flowering dogwood Cornus florida Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) is common in this part of Oak Ridge. Many trees were planted, including some forms with pink flowers such as this one (Cornus florida f. rubra). The tree immediately to its south is the standard white-flowering form. During the first week of May in the days before and after the date of Lincoln’s funeral, these trees can be found blooming at their peak. 39.821413 N, 89.653870 W  Flowering Dogwood Entrance
48 94-28 Hybrid oak Quercus ×megaleia This Hybrid oak (Quercus ×megaleia) was grown from seed collected in Macoupin County. The parent tree, a hardy overcup oak tree (Quercus lyrata) growing well north of the normal natural range, was pollinated by an adjacent bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa).  It has very large acorns and, as an F1 hybrid, displays great vigor. 39.825922 N, 89.662624 W  Hybrid Oak 94-28 Misc. Trees
49 0-030   Thornless Honeylocust Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis A thornless honeylocust (Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis) that probably is a spontaneous native tree which sprouted here on its own. It bears some seeds, which most planted cultivars do not, and displays a very erect and unbranched trunk with deeply plated bark uncharacteristic of most cultivars. Honeylocusts vary in thorniness: while the thorny ones are better prepared to resist browsing animals, the thornless ones like this specimen can devote all of their energy to growth, out-competing their neighbors in the absence of such browsing. Both types often can be seen growing together. 39.824724 N, 89.654869 W  Thornless Honeylocust Misc. Trees
50 0-031 Yew trees Taxus cuspidata Yew trees (Taxus cuspidata) and their ornamental cultivars are evergreen and thus frequently seen planted in cemeteries as symbols of everlasting life. In our area, most of them are the hardy Japanese yew or its hybrids, while in milder climates one often encounters English yew (Taxus baccata). This specimen and the two east of it, unlike most, have not been sheared and have been allowed to grow in their natural form. They grow slowly, tolerate shade, and can live to very great age (a specimen this large easily could have been planted prior to World War II). Yews are dioecious and only the female trees bear seeds; the leaves are soft and friendly to the touch, but inedible and highly poisonous. 39.824742 N, 89.655140 W  Yew Misc. Trees
51 0-032  River birch Betula nigra River birch (Betula nigra) is the only birch native to central Illinois and has evolved to resist the bronze birch borer that kills white-barked birch species planted in hot-summer areas of the Midwest. The species is commonly planted in Springfield and can be found growing wild along river flood plains. It has a graceful habit, can grow rapidly, tolerates very wet soil, and has attractive, salmon-colored peeling bark. 39.824532 N, 89.654521 W  River Birch Misc. Trees
52 0-033  Osage-orange Maclura pomifera This picturesque tree is the largest Osageorange (Maclura pomifera) in Oak Ridge, and at nearly 16 feet in circumference it probably is the largest in Springfield. We suspect it was planted in 1865, when the Osage-orange hedge (see 0-006) was planted around the old part of the cemetery, but it escaped hedging and was able to grow naturally to full size. It is a male tree so it does not produce hedge-apples. The tree has rock-hard wood and its thorny nature made it useful for hedging in the mid-1800s, prior to the invention of barbed wire. It was the first plant species introduced into cultivation by the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Be sure to note the artistic nature of its trunk and bark. 39.824557 N, 89.661537 W  Osage Orange Misc. Trees
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